deep tissue massage

Massage therapy helps relieve tension that nestles in our muscles.

It also helps restore our sense of oneness with our body. Yet, when we call to call book a massage, we often forget that there are many types from which to choose. Let’s pick one that we specialize in at Health In Hands: Deep tissue massage.

The name gives some clues, some “deep” clues.

The technical definition of a deep tissue massage, according to MassageMag.com, is “a technique that focuses primarily on the deep layers of muscles and the fascia. Sometimes this technique involves the therapist using firmer pressure in order to reach these key areas and get them to release, which is why this particular massage is oftentimes recommended for people who are comfortable with a slightly more intense touch.”

So, how deep should your massage be?

A deep tissue massage provides that extra layer of pressure, which in turn, allows for greater release of stored-up stress and tension in your muscles, which like a domino effect, reverberate throughout your body. It’s especially beneficial after hours of computer work or labor that involves standing and reaching, where your upper body and lower body muscles go into somewhat of overdrive. A massage should never be painful. Your massage therapist will ask you at the beginning of the session what kind of pressure you prefer: light, medium, or heavy. During the massage, a check-in usually happens. Of course, some spots may be more sensitive than others. At any time during your massage – deep tissue or otherwise – you can always let your therapist know if the pressure needs to be adjusted; from deep to medium, and vice-versa.

If you find that you benefit from a deep tissue massage, keep it going with a spa membership.

Benefits and perks are deep, too.